Ehre sei dir, Gott, gesungen

(Glory to thee, God, be sounded) for soprano, alto, tenor and bass, vocal ensemble, oboe d’amore I+II, strings and basso continuo

Also hat Gott die Welt geliebt

(In truth hath God the world so loved) for soprano and bass, vocal ensemble, oboe I+II, oboe da caccia, violoncello piccolo, strings and basso continuo Information on reflective lecture: For reasons of copyright, the video of the reflective lecture by Hans Magnus Enzensberger is not available online.

Johannespassion

(St John Passion) No listener can be left unmoved by the bleak magnificence of the introductory chorus “Herr, unser Herrscher” (Lord, thou our master), set to the text of Psalm 8. Throbbing bass notes, streams of blood and violent blows in the middle voices as well as incessant friction in the mercilessly descending woodwinds create … Read More

Gott der Herr ist Sonn und Schild

(God is our true sun and shield!) for soprano, alto, tenor and bass, oboe I+II, horn I+II, timpani, strings and basso continuo Composed for Reformation Day in 1725, cantata BWV 79 (“God is our true sun and shield!”) is conceptually distinct from its more famous relation, BWV 80.

Schauet doch und sehet, ob irgendein Schmerz sei

(Look indeed and see then if there be a grief) for alto, tenor and bass, vocal ensemble, recorder I+II, oboe da caccia I+II, slide trumpet, strings and basso continuo Scenic intervention on the cantata text: Giovanni Netzer (text), Samuel Streiff (mayor), Martin Ostermeier (prophet)

Christus, der ist mein Leben

(Lord Christ, he is my being) for soprano, tenor and bass, vocal ensemble, corno, oboe d’amore I+II, strings and basso continuo First performed on 12 September 1723, the cantata “Lord Christ, he is my being” can be viewed as an experimental predecessor to Bach’s chorale cantata cycle of 1724/25. In contrast to the cantatas of … Read More

Preise, Jerusalem, den Herrn

(Praise, O Jerusalem, the Lord) for soprano, alto, tenor and bass, vocal ensemble, trumpets I-IV, timpani, flauto dolce I+II, oboe I-III, oboe d’ amore I+II, strings and basso continuo When Bach commenced his position as Thomas Cantor in 1723, he was, despite a long selection process with many rival candidates, the great hope of an … Read More